Posts Tagged "Collectibles"

1932 Pontiac Convertible Built for Love Letters

Posted by on Jan 12, 2015 in 1920s and 1930s, All Blog Posts, Vintage Style | 0 comments

Stopping at the gas pump is not always so exciting. A few days ago I pulled in expecting just a chore. This 1932 Pontiac Convertible was in the mechanics area of the gas station. So this is why we call it a trunk. Is it filled with love letters?

 

1932 Pontiac Convertible

1932 Pontiac Convertible Original Colors

1932 Pontiac Convertible

1932 Pontiac Convertible car. You Drive. I’ll write.

1932 Pontiac Convertible

1932 Pontiac Convertible Trunk for Love Letters

1932 Pontiac Convertible

1932 Pontiac Convertible Antique California License Plate

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Christian Science at Bowdoin College

Posted by on Dec 4, 2014 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Bowdoin College, Christian Science, Holiday, Media, Portland Maine, WW2, WW2 Love Letter | 0 comments

Young people impress me. I hope if I ever visit Bowdoin College that it will be the best the trip of my life.

Bowdoin College Tea Cup

Chai Brew in Bowdoin China Teacup

I spent two years traversing history to meet my parents in the 40s. It started with 300 love letters from my dad to my mother. Arline had a fall soon after she gave me the letters. I nursed her  for two months over the 2012 winter holidays. Two years later I’m back on extended visit. My chai tea multi-cultural brew is delicious in old Bowdoin teacups.

Family history research dropped me at the door of Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910), founder of Christian Science. It started when my eye caught a first edition of her CONCORDANCE to MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS at a thrift store.

Concordance to Miscellaneous Writings

CONCORDANCE to MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS by Mary Baker Eddy

In Miscellaneous Writings (1883-1896), in Easter Services, there’s a sermon by a “former member of the Congregational Church”, a Bowdoin Graduate named Rev. D.A.Easton. “He left his old church…because he was not satisfied with a man-like God, but wanted to become a God-like man.” What Easton found in Christian Science surprised him.

Google is like a concordance. I googled Bowdoin and Christian Science. I got: “Student Lecture Series Debuts with Talks on Christian Science and Squirrel Diabetes”.   The 2013 article highlights “Food for Thought” lectures. The twice a month talks are presented as a fun study break “for students to talk about anything they want to”. The speaker on Christian Science, Alioto, refers to her faith as being in the category of Bowdoin “topics such as religion — ones that students tend to view as taboo or uncomfortable”. Her talk was titled “Go Away…I’m Healing”.

In other old news Bowdoin made headlines last year when it ousted a Christian Bible study group’s leaders, despite student protest. Chapel was mandatory at Bowdoin in Morris Densmore’s day, the 1940s. Important and serious talks were held there. The September Commencement of 1942 graduated sixteen “Accelerated Seniors” at Bowdoin. Three degrees were conferred in absentia for the men already in the service. That left only thirteen graduates in attendance. It was a small Commencement, first time in Bowdoin’s history the ceremony was moved to the chapel.

Critical thinking requires intelligence plus an open-mind. In an earlier blog I jotted about how WW2 was an attack on liberal arts and critical thinking. To understand Christian Science takes an open-mind.  In Christian Science the Bible is explained in mystical intelligent context.  C.S. is a good fit for Bowdoin.

At the Food for Talk debut students “flooded in”. No short thirst for knowledge there. The squirrel diabetes lecture was presented as comedy. But when Alioto shared about being a Christian Scientist, finally in her senior year, apparently sort of outing herself as a Christian to the community at large “Her anecdotes and reflections on life as a Christian Scientist on a college campus inspired a stream of questions from the audience, as well as a discussion about the presence of religion in the Bowdoin community.” Yea, a mid-course correction. She welcomed the “gifts” of intellectual curiosity.

Christian Science was no squirrel in 18th century New England. Here’s a link to a film about Mary Baker. I dismiss commentator views that C.S. was more applicable before modern medicine. In light of modern physics and my own experience as an RN and acupuncturist, C.S. Divine Mind fits better than ever our modern days. I ponder God. I sure am thankful for great minds like Mary’s, for her teachings, for my Bowdoin heritage and beautiful Bowdoin china.

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When I am Old I Shall Drive a Ford Model A

Posted by on Nov 1, 2014 in 1920s and 1930s, All Blog Posts, Vintage Style | 0 comments

After WWII, cars were hard to come by and my parents had to go to Boston (from Maine) to buy their first car. The family had a Ford Station Wagon in the 60s. And now I drive a Ford Explorer. It’s leftover from my Colorado cowboy days. I wash my car at a self-service place. And just when I was thinking I deserve a more classy carwash experience, look what pulled in for a wash.

1929 Ford Model A Car

1929 Ford Model A Car, My DREAM Car!

Santa Barbara is old car heaven. Beautifully restored vehicles cruise our streets daily. Henry Ford was into healthy lifestyle. Ford built health into his engines. No surprise to see the word HEALTH stamped on the Model A engine. Ford didn’t smoke or drink. Ford design was about simplicity. He was appalled when folks got greedy wanting more than one car, putting in two car garages and such. Henry Ford was opposed to lifestyle excess, believed in truth, health, and ideas like sustainability. Ford is my kind of man, my kind of car.

Model A Health Heater

Model A Healthy Heater

 

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