Posts Tagged "Turn of the Century"

Christian Science at Bowdoin College

Posted by on Dec 4, 2014 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Bowdoin College, Christian Science, Holiday, Media, Portland Maine, WW2, WW2 Love Letter | 0 comments

Young people impress me. I hope if I ever visit Bowdoin College that it will be the best the trip of my life.

Bowdoin College Tea Cup

Chai Brew in Bowdoin China Teacup

I spent two years traversing history to meet my parents in the 40s. It started with 300 love letters from my dad to my mother. Arline had a fall soon after she gave me the letters. I nursed her  for two months over the 2012 winter holidays. Two years later I’m back on extended visit. My chai tea multi-cultural brew is delicious in old Bowdoin teacups.

Family history research dropped me at the door of Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910), founder of Christian Science. It started when my eye caught a first edition of her CONCORDANCE to MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS at a thrift store.

Concordance to Miscellaneous Writings

CONCORDANCE to MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS by Mary Baker Eddy

In Miscellaneous Writings (1883-1896), in Easter Services, there’s a sermon by a “former member of the Congregational Church”, a Bowdoin Graduate named Rev. D.A.Easton. “He left his old church…because he was not satisfied with a man-like God, but wanted to become a God-like man.” What Easton found in Christian Science surprised him.

Google is like a concordance. I googled Bowdoin and Christian Science. I got: “Student Lecture Series Debuts with Talks on Christian Science and Squirrel Diabetes”.   The 2013 article highlights “Food for Thought” lectures. The twice a month talks are presented as a fun study break “for students to talk about anything they want to”. The speaker on Christian Science, Alioto, refers to her faith as being in the category of Bowdoin “topics such as religion — ones that students tend to view as taboo or uncomfortable”. Her talk was titled “Go Away…I’m Healing”.

In other old news Bowdoin made headlines last year when it ousted a Christian Bible study group’s leaders, despite student protest. Chapel was mandatory at Bowdoin in Morris Densmore’s day, the 1940s. Important and serious talks were held there. The September Commencement of 1942 graduated sixteen “Accelerated Seniors” at Bowdoin. Three degrees were conferred in absentia for the men already in the service. That left only thirteen graduates in attendance. It was a small Commencement, first time in Bowdoin’s history the ceremony was moved to the chapel.

Critical thinking requires intelligence plus an open-mind. In an earlier blog I jotted about how WW2 was an attack on liberal arts and critical thinking. To understand Christian Science takes an open-mind.  In Christian Science the Bible is explained in mystical intelligent context.  C.S. is a good fit for Bowdoin.

At the Food for Talk debut students “flooded in”. No short thirst for knowledge there. The squirrel diabetes lecture was presented as comedy. But when Alioto shared about being a Christian Scientist, finally in her senior year, apparently sort of outing herself as a Christian to the community at large “Her anecdotes and reflections on life as a Christian Scientist on a college campus inspired a stream of questions from the audience, as well as a discussion about the presence of religion in the Bowdoin community.” Yea, a mid-course correction. She welcomed the “gifts” of intellectual curiosity.

Christian Science was no squirrel in 18th century New England. Here’s a link to a film about Mary Baker. I dismiss commentator views that C.S. was more applicable before modern medicine. In light of modern physics and my own experience as an RN and acupuncturist, C.S. Divine Mind fits better than ever our modern days. I ponder God. I sure am thankful for great minds like Mary’s, for her teachings, for my Bowdoin heritage and beautiful Bowdoin china.

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No Time to Write? Send a Postcard!

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in 1920s and 1930s, All Blog Posts, Mail and The U.S. Post Office, Media, Vintage Style | 0 comments

Have a Heart Postcard

Have a Heart
c. 1915

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Mattie May, Arline’s Mother

Posted by on Jan 27, 2013 in All Blog Posts, Portland Maine, Vintage Style | 0 comments

Mattie Plummer in Maine

Mattie, Arline’s mother second from left c.1895

I write about old fashioned 1940s courtship. I connect to a young woman further back. This is an old photo of Arline’s mother, my maternal grandmother Mattie (Martha) in rural Cumberland. I’ve had a decades long desire to learn more about Mattie, about my mother’s parents, their turbulent relationship.
Below Right: Mattie is top right. Mattie’s eldest daughter who is my mother’s sister, Rena stands before her. Top left is Ann Eliza, Mattie’s mother. Bottom left is Eunice: Ann Eliza’s mother. Photo is four generations of my maternal lineage. Family history treasures.

Four generations in a Maine family

Mattie in 4 Generations

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Great Grandfather Arthur

Posted by on Dec 28, 2012 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Historical Portland, Media, Portland Maine, Vintage Style | 2 comments

My quest for family history on my mother’s side is turning up photos.

My Great Grandfather Arthur is Seated

This portrait is of my mother’s maternal grandfather and his brothers, here all pallbearers at their father’s funeral. Seated is her grandfather Arthur Edmund Thurlow, then L to R are his brother’s Winfred Scott, Harry Wesley, and Frank Eugene Thurlow.

For a time Arthur lived with his wife in the home of my mother’s cousins. On Sundays Arthur walked over to mom’s home on Forest Ave. (the house is still there, see below) with his Bible. The Berry’s owned the larger house below, they had a son and a daughter. And Arline’s house was in the back.

Her parents did’t have a car. Her dad had a truck at one point.

Arline’s Parent’s Home
Forest Ave., Portland, Maine

They’d be in the kitchen when Arthur visited because the children had their Sunday bath in a kitchen tub. Arthur would bounce Arline on his knee and sing her a little jingle. Mom loved it because the song was different each time, funny and surprising.

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