Posts Tagged "U.S. Navy"

Sailor who Never Went to Sea

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Bowdoin College, Mail and The U.S. Post Office, Media, WW2, WW2 Letters, WW2 Love Letter, WWII Letter | 0 comments

Today is February 1st, 2015. I pull a WW2 love letter, the first one that matches the date, but 1943. Today lends itself to the fine the art of avoiding writing by reading sentimental old love letters.  This is how one writer spent her Super Bowl Sunday. Morris would be at the T.V. if he were here. But he’s now seventy-two years ago, the Morris who is at Bowdoin College in winter. His good friend has just been drafted, got a notice and is leaving. Morris is returning from the movie Casablanca and finds a sailor lying out in cold Maine snow:

Excerpt WW2 Love Letter

Sailor who Never Went to Sea. Image of WW2 Letter

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Christian Science Raised the Dead in WW2

Posted by on Nov 21, 2014 in 1920s and 1930s, 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Christian Science, Media, Medicine, Photo, Vintage Style, WW2 | 0 comments

Mark Twain hailed her “the most interesting and extraordinary woman that ever lived”. Wow! They both used the same copyright lawyer in Boston. By WW2 Mary Baker Eddy’s organization was an omnipotent political force.  WW2 soldiers who were Catholic “boys” were allowed access to Catholic priests, Jewish boys got to have rabbis, and so Christian Science boys brought in C.S. ministry. The C.S. church ranked next to the Red Cross for goods supply to war zones. Ministry to soldiers landed C.S. practitioners and their natural medicine literature to war zones and across enemy lines. Channels for the Divine, the soldiers themselves healed physical wounds and mind-body misery using only energy medicine. Accounts record the wounded healed, the dead raised.

Christian Science Center Algiers

Christian Science Center Algiers

The very inventions: long-range bombers, rockets, finally the atomic bomb which projected Fear of Extinction through the human consciousness shrank the physical dimensions of the globe to those of a neighborhood. “Mortal mind calls for what ONLY immortal mind can supply, Divine Love. ~Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910), founder of Christian Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Easter Bunny Leaves Love Letter

Posted by on Apr 20, 2014 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Holiday, Mail and The U.S. Post Office, Media, Navy, Portland Maine, Vintage Style, WW2, WW2 Letters, WW2 Love Letter, WWII Letter | 2 comments

Easter falls on the 1st Sunday following the 1st full moon after the spring equinox, between 3/22 and 4/25. Copy that?

I went to church with Arline last week. I used to go, and was once a Christian. I walked out of the church when a substitute minister started preaching against abortion from the pulpit. It was too much. But I loved the service last week, the organ, the choir, the people greeting each other saying “Peace be with you.”

In 1945, Easter was April 1st. This year it’s tomorrow, the 20th. I pulled one of my father’s letters from April 20th 1945. Morris had been stationed in the South Pacific 5 months. He was engaged to Arline. They did it in letters. He sent the news of their engagement to his parents in a telegram. Arline had been at his folks home for dinner. In the letter Mose asks, “What were your first feelings when they read the telegram?” Awesome! Then he details his future pay as a lieutenant.

let4:20:45:crop

Morris’s memorial service was April 1st, 1999. I remember him every April Fools Day. He had a dry sense of humor. He had a way with puns. At the memorial service his brother Henry said, “Morris was the last of the good guys.”

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Flying Fish at End of Rainbow

Posted by on Nov 28, 2013 in 1940s Life, All Blog Posts, Mail and The U.S. Post Office, Media, Navy, South Pacific, V-12 Navy Program, Vintage Style, WW2, WW2 Letters, WW2 Love Letter, WWII Letter | 0 comments

Love Letter excerpt by Morris to Arline November 1944, of awe and gratitude.

Love Letter

Love Letter 1940
End of the Rainbow

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WW2 Phonograph Photo and V-Discs

Posted by on Mar 29, 2013 in All Blog Posts, Media, Navy, Photo, Vintage Style, WW2 | 0 comments

In 1940 vinyl was used as a record material, but mostly commercially for transcription discs. Practically no home discs were stamped with vinyl. In a “FLash of Army Life” report by the Associated Press, one soldier:
First Cook Lewis Lawrence Jr. brought a phonograph recording machine from Chicago and “is cashing in on the yen of his buddies to pour sweet nothings of sentiment into the ears of the girls they left behind. The soldiers speak into it. Their tender messages are registered on the discs. Finished products are mailed to sweethearts at home. The cook charged 35, 50, or 70 cents the amount–depending on the verbal and financial lengths to which the troopers are willing to go.”

Phonograph Machine in WW2

Phonograph Machine in WW2

The War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS) on May 26, 1942. On August 1, 1942, the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) union went on strike against the major American recording companies over disagreements regarding royalty payments. The union called a ban on all commercial recordings as part of a struggle to get the royalties from record sales for a fund for out-of-work musicians.

AFM union led by trumpeter James Petrillo, had previously opposed the recording of music, or “canned music”. Musicians were being replaced with records in radio. In cafes and bars bands were being replaced with jukeboxes. For over a year no music was recorded by unionised musicians in America. The only important group of musicians not part of the union was the Boston Symphony.

But recordings made for the military, called V-discs (V for Victory), were immune and not affected by the strike apparently because V-disc recordings would not go to civilians.

During the strike no union musician could record for any record company. But the strike didn’t prohibit performances on live radio shows or in concert. While the move was seen as advantageous for musicians who wanted payment each time their songs were played in jukeboxes or on radio, PBS FCC chair James Fly suggested 60% of the country’s radio stations could go out of business. As the ban approached, numerous artists rushed to get in last-minute recordings in July 1942. Among them were Count Basie, Bing Crosby, Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Judy Garland, Benny Goodman, Guy Lombardo, and Glenn Miller.

When this stockpile was exhausted, record companies turned to re-releasing older recordings – some as far back as the dawn of the recording era in the mid-1920s. One of the most successful re-releases was Harry James “All Or Nothing at All” which featured Frank Sinatra before he became famous.

Decca and Capitol gave into the AFM in 1943, RCA Victor and Columbia held out but eventually backed down in 1944. It was over two years before the issues were resolved and the recording ban ended. Booms in record sales returned after World War II. Vinyl long play records were introduced which could contain an entire symphony. 45s usually contained one hit popularized on the radio, plus another song on the back “flip” side.

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